Spanair Crash at Madrid

  • August 21, 2008
  • Uncategorized
  • 0 Comments
  • kflyer

Proudly Hosted by ImageShack.us
SpanAir flight JK5022, an MD-82, on MAD – LPA ( Canary Islands ), skidded off the runway in Madrid Barajas Airport (MAD) yesterday, recording the worst air crash in Spanish history in the last 25 years. The aircraft, EC – HFP ( cn 53148 ) ( Tommy Desmet ) ran off runway R36 and the weather around at the time of the accident was METAR LEMD 201300Z 14004KT CAVOK 29/03 Q1018 NOSIG, which was a bit on the warmer side. The aircraft had first left the gate at 1305, but returned to the ramp at 1342 due to mechanical problems and was then given an ETD of 1425. The left engine caught fire and dragged this Star Alliance logojet off the runway according to some newspaper reports, although this is yet to be uncovered. At the time of departure, there were 166 passengers ( 164 + 2 infants ) and 9 crew members onboard. From those onboard, 145 – 153 people probably died and there have been 28 survivors. A list of passengers who were onboard is now available here on the Spanair website. This accident is the 24th loss of an MD-80 worldwide and is the 7th worst accident in Spain. The aircraft which first flew on 11/01/1993 was powered by two Pratt & Whitney JT8D – 219 engines.

The service was also a codeshare with Lufthansa, under the flight number LH255.

Finally, a bit of info on the aircraft from airfleets.net;
Registration | Remark
18/11/1993 Korean Air HL7204
18/06/1998 Korean Air HL7548
23/07/1999 Spanair EC-HFP
20/08/08 Destroyed in a take-off accident at Madrid-Barajas airport (LEMD) at 12:30Z. Left engine failed and went in fire few secods after t/o.

Spanair was owned by SAS and the parent company, which has suffered a series of incidents with its own fleet of Bombardier Q400s fell 6.6% to 43.7 kronor.
Standard & Poor’s said in a note that Spanair, which SAS had been trying to sell, probably now has no future and that the parent company may itself face a class action, depending on the outcome of investigations.
A probe will be carried out by the Spanish Comision de Investigacion de Accidentes e Incidentes de Aviacion Civil, or CIAIAC, Boeing said. The NTSB said it will send investigator John Lovell and four technical specialists to Madrid to assist.

Spain’s worst air disaster killed 583 when two Boeing 747s collided at Tenerife North airport in March 1977. A KLM Royal Dutch Airlines jumbo taking off in fog hit a Pan American World Airways plane taxiing for its own departure. The flights had been diverted from nearby Las Palmas — where today’s Spanair service was headed — due to a bomb warning and were making their way to that destination when the crash occurred

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *